Information on Xeomin, A New Botox

Xeomin (incobotulinum Toxin A) is the newest of the Botox like drugs to become FDA approved. Xeomin is manufactured by Merz pharmaceuticals and is the third botulinum toxin available in the US to treat cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, and glabeller lines. It joins Botox (onabotulinum toxin A, Allergan) and Dysport (abobotulinum toxin A, Medicis). These neurotoxins also have many “off-label” uses including migraine treatment, forehead lines, “crows feet” as well as for decreasing sweating. Xeomin is marketed as a “purer” botulinum toxin and seems to have a faster onset of action than Botox. It is also supplied similarly to Botox, available in both 50 and 100 unit vials.

 

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